We Really Mean It This Time: Recently Enacted FOIA Improvement Act of 2016 Mandates

On June 13, Congress passed the FOIA Improvement Act of 2016, and President Obama signed the bill into law on June 30, nearly 50 years after the original Freedom of Information Act (“FOIA”) was first enacted. The new law was effective as of June 30.

On July 19, the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Information Policy (“OIP”) issued its first guidelines relating to the Act, prompting agencies to begin carrying out new FOIA mandates in the way they respond to and give notice regarding FOIA requests. OIP said it will continue to issue guidance on the Act “on a rolling basis.”….

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Privacy Shield Finalized – How Everyone Can Take Advantage of the New European Data Transfer Framework

Background

The EU Data Protection Directive 95/46/EC (the “Directive”) creates the legal framework for national data-protection laws in each EU Member State.  The Directive states that personal data may only be transferred to countries outside the EU when an “adequate” level of protection is guaranteed.  Few exemptions apply, and the laws of the United States are not considered by the European Union as providing an adequate level of data protection.  As a result, if a company intended to transfer personal data from the EU to the U.S., it traditionally had to achieve the Directive’s required “adequacy” status through: Safe Harbor certification; standard contractual clauses; or binding corporate rules….

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Privacy Shield Released – How Employers Can Take Advantage of the New European Data Transfer Framework (2016)

The EU Data Protection Directive 95/46/EC (the “Directive”) creates the legal framework for national data-protection laws in each EU member state. The Directive states that personal data may only be transferred to countries outside the EU when an “adequate” level of protection is guaranteed. Few exemptions apply, and the laws of the United States are not considered by the European Union as providing an adequate level of data protection. As a result, if a company or employer intended to transfer personal data from the EU into the U.S., they traditionally had to achieve the Directive’s required “adequacy” status through: Safe Harbor certification; standard contractual clauses; or binding corporate rules….

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Privacy Shield: Safe Harbor 2.0? (2016)

As negotiators for the US Department of Commerce (“DOC”), Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”), and the European Commission move toward an agreement intended to allow continued US-EU data transfers, a closer look at the history of “Safe Harbor” and the proposed “Privacy Shield” framework leaves some questions unanswered.

Safe Harbor Invalidation
Under EU Data Protection Directive 95/46/EC (the “Directive”), personal data controlled in the EU may be transferred to countries outside the EU only when an “adequate level of protection” is guaranteed. From 2000 to 2015, thousands of companies achieved this adequacy status through the US-EU “Safe Harbor” framework, an annual certification process approved by the European Commission and made available to US companies subject to the jurisdiction of the FTC or Department of Transportation…..privacyshield