Data Maps and Data Inventories: A Comparison of US Law, EU Law, and Soon-To-Be EU Law

Data Maps and Data Inventories: A Comparison of US Law, EU Law, and Soon-To-Be EU Law

In the United States companies are not required to inventory the type of data that they maintain, or map where that data flows in (and out) of their organization. That said, knowing the type of data that you collect, where it is being held, with whom it is being shared, and how it is being transferred is a central component of most mature data privacy and data security programs. For example, while the law does not require that companies inventory the data that they collect, federal and state law is being interpreted as requiring that companies use, at a minimum, reasonable and appropriate security to protect certain types of “sensitive” information such as Social Security Numbers. It is difficult for many companies to defend their security practices if they lack confidence as to whether they are collecting sensitive information and, if so, where it is being maintained. As a result, while it is not a legal requirement to conduct a data inventory it is, for many, a de facto step to comply with other legal requirements. …data-maps

Guidelines for Data Maps and Data Inventories

Guidelines for Data Maps and Data Inventories

Knowing the type of data that you collect, where it is being held, with whom it is being shared, and how it is being transferred is a central component of most data privacy and data security programs. The process of answering these questions is often referred to as a “data map” or a “data inventory.”Although the questions that a data map tries to solve are relatively straightforward, the process of conducting a data map can be daunting depending upon the size and structure of an organization. In addition, it is important to remember that data constantly changes within an organization. As a result, organizations must consider how often to invest the time to conduct a data map and, once invested, how long the information will be useful. …

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How to Conduct a Data Inventory of Your Human Resource Records (2016)

Some of the largest data breaches in recent years involved the loss of employment records. Knowing the type of data that a human resource department collects, where it is being held, with whom it is being shared, and how it is being transferred is a central component of most data security programs. The process of answering these questions is often referred to as a “data inventory,” and can be an instrumental component in preventing a data breach….howtoconduct

What to Consider When Using Fingerprint Identification Technology (2016)

Fingerprint identification technology uses fingerprints to uniquely identify individuals. The technology has been used by law enforcement agencies for decades, and dozens of statutes regulate when government agencies may collect fingerprints, how they are permitted to use them, and with whom they can be shared….fingerprint

How to Conduct a Data Inventory (2016)

Knowing the type of data that you collect, where it is being held, with whom it is being shared, and how it is being transferred is a central component of most data privacy and data security programs. The process of answering these questions is often referred to as a “data map” or a “data inventory.”  Although the questions that a data map tries to solve are relatively straightforward, the process of conducting a data map can be daunting depending upon the size and structure of an organization . . . 2016DataInventory

Data Maps and Data Inventories At A Glance (2015)

Knowing the type of data that you collect, where it is being held, with whom it is being shared, and how it is being transferred is a central component of many data privacy and data security programs.  The process of answering these questions is often referred to as a data map or a data inventory.  Although the questions that a data map tries to solve are relatively straightforward, the process of conducting one can be daunting . . . Data_Map_At A Glance (2)

Boulder Event: Conducting a Data Map or a Data Inventory

August 18, 2015 (4:30MT – 6:00 MT)

This in-person event is sponsored by the IAPP and will be held in Bryan Cave’s Boulder, Colorado office.  The event will discuss how to conduct a data map or a data inventory.  It will also include a networking happy hour showcasing Boulder’s award winning microbreweries.  Click here to register.  If you are not a member of the IAPP you will be prompted to “sign up” for an IAPP account as part of registration.

 

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