Companies Perceived By The FTC as Top Violators

Companies Perceived By The FTC as Top Violators

As discussed in previous articles, the FTC collects complaints about organizations that allegedly violate the data privacy, data security, advertising, and marketing laws.

Each month the FTC creates a “Top Violators” report that ranks the fifty organizations with the greatest volume of consumer complaints. The report indicates whether each organization listed was included in the previous month’s report, whether its rank has changed, and the number of complaints received by the FTC that month. For organizations that are new to the report, the FTC reviews their complaints and summarizes the issue, or issues, that have been raised by consumers. …

FTC VIOLATORS

Understanding How the FTC Tracks Privacy Complaints

The FTC collects complaints about companies that allegedly violate the data privacy, data security, advertising, and marketing laws. The result is a massive database of consumer complaints known as “Consumer Sentinel” that is used by the FTC and other consumer protection regulators to identify and investigate enforcement targets.

Regulators can use Consumer Sentinel to search for complaints on any company. They can also request that the database alert them to new complaints about an organization, or connect them with other law enforcement agencies that might have an interest in investigating the same organization. In addition to these functionalities, the FTC also creates a “Top Violator” report and a “Surge” report that track those organizations that the FTC believes may have a suspicious pattern of consumer complaints.1 The end result is that the vast majority of FTC enforcement actions target companies identified within the FTC’s database….

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Privacy Regulation Regime Change: Bad or Good for ISPs?

The Federal Communications Commission (“FCC”) is on the verge of proposing new federal privacy regulations for internet broadband service providers (“ISPs”). ISPs were previously policed by the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”). The FCC’s rulemaking is an outgrowth of its determination last year that wireline and wireless ISPs are telecommunications common carriers subject to Title II of the Communications Act, including the privacy provisions in Section 222 thereof. That determination, which is still under attack in court, effectively moved ISPs from FTC to FCC jurisdiction. ISPs will soon be forced to grapple with the details of a proposed FCC privacy regulatory scheme that has already been broadly outlined in a “Fact Sheet” released by the FCC. The FCC will fully unveil its specific proposals in a formal Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (“NPRM”) scheduled for an FCC vote on March 31….

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The FTC Top Violators Report At A Glance (2015)

FTC Violators_At A Glance

Each month the FTC’s Division of Planning and Information (“DPI”) creates a “Top Violators” report that ranks the fifty companies with the greatest volume of consumer complaints for that month. The report indicates whether each company listed was included in the previous month’s report, whether its rank has changed, and the number of complaints received by the FTC that month. For companies that are new to the report, DPI reviews their complaints and summarizes the issue, or issues, that are being raised . . .

 

The FTC Surge Report At a Glance (2015)

FTC Surge Reports_At A Glance

The FTC collects complaints about companies alleged data privacy, data security, advertising, and marketing violations.  Each month the FTC’s Division of Planning and Information (“DPI”) creates a “Surge” report that identifies those companies with the greatest increase in consumer complaint volume . . .

 

How the FTC Tracks Companies At a Glance (2015)

FTC Tracking_At A Glance

The FTC collects complaints about companies that allegedly violate the data privacy, data security, advertising, and marketing laws. The result is a massive database of consumer complaints known as “Consumer Sentinel” that is used by the FTC and other consumer protection regulators to identify and investigate enforcement targets. . .